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Wednesday, 5 December 2012

Health Minister's written answers on smoking in hospitals

SOURCE
 
Written answers on hospital smoke-free policies
Richard Simpson (Mid Scotland and Fife) (Scottish Labour): To ask the Scottish Government what steps it has taken in the last three years to ensure that there is no smoking in the grounds of all hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals. (S4W-11310)

Michael Matheson: Smoking is prohibited by law only in wholly or substantially enclosed public places. Areas in the open air, such as hospital grounds and car parks, are not covered by this legislation. The Scottish Government issued guidance on smoking policies for the NHS, local authorities, and care providers in December 2005 to support the implementation of the smoking ban.

This encouraged NHS boards and other service providers, to demonstrate leadership in implementing smoking policies and promoting smoke-free lifestyles. It also highlighted the benefits of going further than the strict parameters of the law and working towards completely smoke-free policies to maximise health gain. This was subsequently reinforced in the chief executive letter Health Promoting Health Service: HPHS CEL (01) 2012.

While the decision to move to smoke-free hospital grounds is currently a matter for individual boards to determine the Scottish Government is currently developing a new tobacco control strategy, which we intend to publish early next year, and we will consider smoking within NHS grounds as part of that work.

Richard Simpson (Mid Scotland and Fife) (Scottish Labour): To ask the Scottish Government what steps it has taken in the last three years to introduce a ban on smoking in psychiatric hospitals. (S4W-11311)

Michael Matheson: Smoking has been banned in public places in Scotland since 2006 by virtue of the Smoking, Health and Social Care (Scotland) Act 2005. However, the law includes an exemption for residential mental health institutions and permits smoking in designated indoor rooms in such settings. During 2009 the Scottish Government consulted with stakeholders, service users and the public on the best way to achieve smoke-free mental health services in Scotland. The smoke-free mental health services in Scotland implementation guidance was issued by NHS Health Scotland on behalf of the Scottish Government in March 2011.

The guidance clearly articulates the benefits behind the drive for a change to smoke-free and the expectation that NHS boards will implement smoke-free policies in mental health services at a pace which suits the services’ particular needs and circumstances. For example, with the support of the guidance, the state hospital, Carstairs has managed a successful transition to its current smoke-free status.

The Scottish Government is committed to developing a new tobacco control strategy for publication early next year. As part of that work we will consider whether there is a need to review progress in this area.


Written answers on second-hand smoke exposure in prisons
Richard Simpson (Mid Scotland and Fife) (Scottish Labour): To ask the Scottish Government what steps it has taken since 2006 to ensure that non-smoking prisoners are not exposed to second-hand smoke in (a) their cells, (b) communal areas and (c) workshops. (S4W-11312)

Kenny MacAskill: I have asked Colin McConnell, chief executive of the Scottish prison service, to respond. His response is as follows:

“Since 26 March 2006 prisoners have not been permitted to smoke in communal areas and workshops within Scottish prison service establishments. Prisoners are allowed to smoke in cells as long as the governor has not designated the cell as a non-smoking cell in accordance with the prison rules. On admission to custody and when moving cells prisoners are asked for their smoking preference to minimise, wherever practicable non-smokers sharing cells with smokers.”

Richard Simpson (Mid Scotland and Fife) (Scottish Labour): To ask the Scottish Government how many complaints the Scottish prison service has received from prisoners regarding passive smoking since 2006.(S4W-11313)

Kenny MacAskill: I have asked Colin McConnell, chief executive of the Scottish prison service, to respond. His response is as follows: “The Scottish prison service does not centrally classify or record complaints specifically regarding passive smoking.”


You have to admire their priorities.

6 comments:

Bill Gibson said...

Answer 1 from M.M.The document he refers to in Dec 2005 was wrong when considering Ventilation. Go to (33) of this link http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/doc/47121/0020880.pdf

Anonymous said...

Every day that passes, these people become more and more divorced from reality.
Why do they want patients and visitors to be forced not to pop outside for a quick fag? It seems that the reason is so that the hospital board members will feel good about themselves. What other reason can there be?

Junican

Lou said...

Well it rather seems that we'd best try and keep Labour out of the hot seat if this Pillock is the shadow health minister.

Link is to his site and current campaigns. Nowt about coming down on sick people wanting a fag.

http://richardsimpson.info/category/campaign/

Lou said...

You may find it useful to look at a recent Chapman Tweet

Our review: Outdoor tobacco smoke seldom likely to pose air quality/health problems http://tobaccocontrol.bmj.com/content/early/2012/12/04/

Belinda said...

Can't find that BMJ link, Lou, are you sure it's correct.

Lou said...

Sent by email.